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Former Navy Seal smashes wingsuit distance record in daring flight
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a425couple
2015-11-13 18:03:22 UTC
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Former Navy Seal smashes wingsuit distance record in daring flight
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2015/11/12/former-navy-seal-smashes-wingsuit-distance-record-in-daring-flight.html?cmpid=NL_SciTech

One Navy SEAL, one mission, one wingsuit . and a world record gets
smashed at more than 140 mph.

An American veteran, retired U.S. Navy SEAL Andy Stumpf, risked his
life to support the SEAL community and set a global record in a
death-defying feat.

"Stumpf jumped from above 37,265 feet to honor friends and families
of fallen warriors to raise awareness and support for the Navy SEAL
Foundation.
The prior record was 17.83 miles absolute distance traveled in a wing suit
- this "Man on a Mission" travelled 18.257 miles, setting a new world
record.

I was wondering what kind of plane they used.
In one of the follow-ups, I see "Caravan" is mentioned.

from
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_208_Caravan
"Performance
Maximum speed: 213 mph (343 km/h; 185 kn) true air speed
Cruise speed: 213 mph (185 kn; 343 km/h) true air speed
Stall speed: 70 mph (61 kn; 113 km/h) calibrated air speed
Never exceed speed: 201 mph (175 kn; 323 km/h) indicated air speed
Range: 1,240 mi (1,078 nmi; 1,996 km) with max fuel and reserves
Service ceiling: 25,000 ft (7,620 m)
Rate of climb: 1,275 ft/min (6.48 m/s)
Wing loading: 31.49 lb/sq ft (153.7 kg/m2)"

So, the plane's 25,000 ceiling was souped up to 37,000?
Did they have, in effect, an air-lock? Or de-pressurize the whole plane?
Vaughn Simon
2015-11-13 18:59:50 UTC
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Post by a425couple
So, the plane's 25,000 ceiling was souped up to 37,000?
Service ceiling refers to the max height where an airplane can maintain
a specified rate of climb at max gross weight, but it's not a limit. If
you are patient, and especially if you are flying light, you may be able
to climb considerably higher.
Post by a425couple
Did they have, in effect, an air-lock? Or de-pressurize the whole plane?
Neither. I'm 95% sure that the Caravan is an unpressurized airplane, so
everyone would need to use oxygen at high altitudes. But there would be
no concern about pressurization or anything like an airlock.
a425couple
2015-11-14 16:45:55 UTC
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Post by a425couple
So, the plane's 25,000 ceiling was souped up to 37,000?
Service ceiling refers to the max height where an airplane can maintain a
specified rate of climb at max gross weight, but it's not a limit. If you
are patient, and especially if you are flying light, you may be able to
climb considerably higher.
Thank you. I had no idea they could get THAT much
higher without alterations,

Here are two crazy flyers.


Crazy Wingsuit Flight -- Man Lands on Water Without Parachute?


Wingsuit landing without deploying a parachute - Gary Connery
Post by a425couple
Did they have, in effect, an air-lock? Or de-pressurize the whole plane?
Neither. I'm 95% sure that the Caravan is an unpressurized airplane, so
everyone would need to use oxygen at high altitudes. But there would be
no concern about pressurization or anything like an airlock.
Jim Wilkins
2015-11-23 00:04:10 UTC
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Post by Vaughn Simon
Post by a425couple
So, the plane's 25,000 ceiling was souped up to 37,000?
Service ceiling refers to the max height where an airplane can
maintain a specified rate of climb at max gross weight, but it's not
a limit. If you are patient, and especially if you are flying
light, you may be able to climb considerably higher.
Post by a425couple
Did they have, in effect, an air-lock? Or de-pressurize the whole plane?
Neither. I'm 95% sure that the Caravan is an unpressurized
airplane, so everyone would need to use oxygen at high altitudes.
But there would be no concern about pressurization or anything like
an airlock.
http://texasturbines.net/en/our-conversions/supervan-900.html

-jsw

george152
2015-11-13 19:06:31 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Former Navy Seal smashes wingsuit distance record in daring flight
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2015/11/12/former-navy-seal-smashes-wingsuit-distance-record-in-daring-flight.html?cmpid=NL_SciTech
One Navy SEAL, one mission, one wingsuit . and a world record gets
smashed at more than 140 mph.
An American veteran, retired U.S. Navy SEAL Andy Stumpf, risked his
life to support the SEAL community and set a global record in a
death-defying feat.
"Stumpf jumped from above 37,265 feet to honor friends and families
of fallen warriors to raise awareness and support for the Navy SEAL
Foundation.
The prior record was 17.83 miles absolute distance traveled in a wing suit
- this "Man on a Mission" travelled 18.257 miles, setting a new world
record.
I was wondering what kind of plane they used.
In one of the follow-ups, I see "Caravan" is mentioned.
from
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_208_Caravan
"Performance
Maximum speed: 213 mph (343 km/h; 185 kn) true air speed
Cruise speed: 213 mph (185 kn; 343 km/h) true air speed
Stall speed: 70 mph (61 kn; 113 km/h) calibrated air speed
Never exceed speed: 201 mph (175 kn; 323 km/h) indicated air speed
Range: 1,240 mi (1,078 nmi; 1,996 km) with max fuel and reserves
Service ceiling: 25,000 ft (7,620 m)
Rate of climb: 1,275 ft/min (6.48 m/s)
Wing loading: 31.49 lb/sq ft (153.7 kg/m2)"
So, the plane's 25,000 ceiling was souped up to 37,000?
Did they have, in effect, an air-lock? Or de-pressurize the whole plane?
With a light load and careful piloting the posted ceiling of most
aircraft can be exceeded.
And they would be on oxygen from 12-15000 ft
a425couple
2015-11-14 17:16:41 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Former Navy Seal smashes wingsuit distance record in daring flight
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2015/11/12/former-navy-seal-smashes-wingsuit-distance-record-in-daring-flight.html?cmpid=NL_SciTech
One Navy SEAL, one mission, one wingsuit . and a world record ---
"Stumpf jumped from above 37,265 feet to honor friends and families
of fallen warriors to raise awareness and support for the Navy SEAL
Foundation.
The prior record was 17.83 miles absolute distance traveled in a wing suit
- this "Man on a Mission" travelled 18.257 miles, setting a new world
record.
from
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_208_Caravan
"Performance
Service ceiling: 25,000 ft (7,620 m)
So, the plane's 25,000 ceiling was souped up to 37,000? ---
With a light load and careful piloting the posted ceiling of most aircraft
can be exceeded.
And they would be on oxygen from 12-15000 ft
Thank you.
Here is a youtube about earlier record.
Presents some interesting information, esp. about
a extra hour needed to avoid "the bends".


US Army Wing Suit Record
Uploaded on Apr 10, 2010 - Staff Sgt. Ben Borger

comments include:
"Prior to take off, the crew of the C-17 and I will..."
"...have to pre-breathe (enriched oxygen to purge nitrogen
from the blood stream) for about one hour."
Byker
2015-11-13 22:28:44 UTC
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Post by a425couple
- this "Man on a Mission" travelled 18.257 miles
About the same distance as from the southwest tip of Staten Island to
Central Park
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